Friday, November 5, 2010

Roast Chicken for the Lazy Types


Roast chicken is the blue chip stock of the cooking world. For an investment of very little effort, and usually very few ingredients, you can pretty much guarantee a decent return: about an hour later savory perfection emerges from the oven. I roast a chicken (and/or a turkey breast) a couple of times a month, often experimenting with a new recipe (my previous roast chicken blog posts are listed below). This week, I used the recipe for Roast Chicken for Les Paresseux (the Lazy Ones) from Dorie Greenspan's new book Around My French Table.

n.o.e.'s notes:


- I made this chicken for the French Fridays with Dorie group - hundreds of cooks world-wide who are working their way through Around My French Table and posting on Fridays. The group members are not posting recipes from the book, so if you like what you see, I'd recommend purchasing the book, or borrowing it from your library.

- The chicken sits on a bed of thick bread as it roasts. Even though this recipe claims to be for lazy folks, I think I was a shade too lazy. I didn't read far enough ahead in the recipe to note that the bread itself becomes a delectable treat. Consequently I used an old bread-end from the freezer, which was definitely improved by sitting in wonderful chicken pan drippings, but starting with a great piece of bread would have been a much better plan.

- I went ahead and trussed the chicken because I ordered a lifetime supply of butcher's twine, and even a lazy person can wrap some string around a chicken and tie a bow.

- My wide, shallow enameled cast iron Dutch oven was perfect for this recipe.

- After the chicken was in the oven for 45 minutes I followed Dories suggestion and added vegetables to the pan (carrots and onions this time) and roasted them for an additional 45 minutes or so, until the chicken is cooked and the vegetables are nicely caramelized and tender.

- Dorie suggests that after the chicken is cooked, it should rest for awhile upside down on a platter so the juices collect in the breast meat, keeping it moist. Being the lazy type that I am, I decided to rest the chicken in the roasting pan so I wouldn't get a platter dirty. The chicken sat in the pan juices, which kept the white meat plenty moist, but the crispy skin got disappointingly soft.

the verdict:

Dorie's recipe produced a perfect roast chicken for a family dinner. We loved the vegetables, especially the onions, which were sweet and nicely browned.

My previous roast chicken posts:

Jamie Oliver's
Roast Chicken in Milk
Ad Hoc
Roast Chicken with Root Vegetables
Thomas Keller's My Favorite Simple Roast Chicken
Martha's Perfect Roast Chicken
Union Square
Herb Roast Chicken

15 comments:

Audrey said...

Of course, I thought of you the second this recipe was chosen, because I remember all the chickens that have gone before. I loved mine, even though I followed an instruction that wasn't there and covered the pot. Oh, well, maybe someday we'll get a chance to compare notes in person! :)

Sarah said...

I did this recipe, too, and it was AMAZING!

Your chicken looks delicious. . .

Di said...

Mmm, that looks wonderful. I'm going to make this one on Sunday, I think.

Clivia said...

Your chicken looks delicious! Thanks for reminding me to read the recipe before I start. ::g::

Candy Girl said...

This looks great and I can't wait to try it later this month.

Kayte said...

How much trussing did I do in Whisk Wednesdays...seems like a ton...seems like I never got it right, can't tie anything up to save my life the right way. Now, yours looks very cute with the bow and all, maybe I should just go with the cute look and save myself the grief of a properly trussed French style chicken Le Cordon Bleu...I swear they make things complicated just for fun. Your chicken looks perfect! YUM.

Eliana said...

I have been looking high and low for a new good roast chicken recipe and it looks like I have found it. Yours looks great Nancy. Let me run now and flag the recipe in my book.

Les rêves d'une boulangère (Brittany) said...

I love your recipe with the little veggies surrounding the chicken. So comforting and homely don't you think?

Tracey said...

I love to roast chicken too, though I mostly butterfly it first since I learned that technique recently. I've still yet to try a recipe from AMFT but this one has definitely climbed toward the top of the list. I really like that Dorie adds veggies so it really becomes a one-pot meal.

scrambledhenfruit said...

Mmmmm...looks so delicious! I can't wait to try this one!

Jess said...

I'm hoping to try this one today and will remember your hints (especially the part about reading the recipe)! Beautiful roast.

mike said...

What a beautiful presentation - truly "french"! I love the rustic nature of it - and can't wait to try this (especially that bread technique)! Glad your family liked it - there's something about browned, sweetened onions.... hm!

Nina said...

Great recipe. It looks delicious. My trick for making the chicken moist and crunchy is boiling it first with some seasonings, onions, and garlic. Then I roast it. I use the stock to make the gravy and a soup.

onewetfoot said...

Sometimes the simplest recipes are the ones I end up going back to again and again. I think this is going to be one of them. The chicken was so flavourful!

Charli said...

I love finding the little treasures hidden all through this book. And I agree--this was definitely one of them!